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24 INCH PUB TABLE : 24 INCH


24 Inch Pub Table : Contemporary Table Designs : Solid Oak Coffee Tables.



24 Inch Pub Table





24 inch pub table






    pub table
  • Any table that is 42" High (Standard Table height is 30")





    inch
  • edge: advance slowly, as if by inches; "He edged towards the car"

  • A unit used to express other quantities, in particular

  • a unit of length equal to one twelfth of a foot

  • column inch: a unit of measurement for advertising space

  • A unit of linear measure equal to one twelfth of a foot (2.54 cm)

  • A very small amount or distance





    24
  • twenty-four: the cardinal number that is the sum of twenty-three and one

  • Classless Inter-Domain Routing (CIDR) is a methodology of allocating IP addresses and routing Internet Protocol packets.

  • Year 24 (XXIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.











The Page brothers




The Page brothers





Ely Cathedral, Cambridgeshire

The Page brothers Arthur and Herbert on the Holy Trinity parish war memorial in Ely Cathedral. The Lady Chapel of Ely Cathedral was the parish church of Holy Trinity parish until the Ely parishes were combined as Ely St Mary in 1938.

Arthur Page was my great-grandfather, the father of my grandmother Phyllis Alice Page, my father's mother. Arthur was born on the 31st March 1879 at Annesdale, Ely, Cambridgeshire. He married my great-grandmother Sophia Cross on 12th January 1901 in the Lady Chapel of Ely Cathedral. They lived on Bull Lane in Ely (today renamed Lisle Lane) before moving to Broad Street, Back Hill and finally Waterside. Arthur was a railway labourer for the Great Eastern Railway, before getting a job with the Co-op.

When World War One broke out, Arthur immediately signed up. He was a Serjeant in the 2nd Battalion of the Suffolk Regiment, and his medal record shows that he arrived in France on the 26th January 1915.

The 2nd Battalion spent their first winter and spring bogged down in the trenches of the Vierstraat area of Flanders, before being returned to Billet at Westoutre on 11th April. They spent the latter part of the spring building the network of trenches in the Ypres salient, and then on June 16th they were part of the force which attacked and consolidated its hold in V Wood and Sanctuary Wood to the east of Ypres. It seems that the Battalion came under what were the first prolonged and sustained gas attacks by the Germans on British troops. During July they returned to billet in Ypres again, but spent the rest of the summer consolidating the hold on the splendidly named Spoil Bank and Bellyache Wood, again to the west of Ypres.

In general, the 2nd Suffolks seem to have spent an uneventful 1915 in Flanders, with few casualties, except for one major incident when, on September 8th, the battalion sustained more than a hundred deaths trying to capture a crater in Sanctuary Wood. Shortly after this, Arthur's brother Herbert was injured, and returned to England. He rejoined the Battalion at the start of 1916, when they were moved south towards St Eloi. Shortly after arriving in the area, Arthur's brother Herbert was killed.

In June 1916, the 2nd Suffolks were removed completely from the fighting and returned to depot at St Omer for training in open warfare. They did not know it, but the Generals were preparing for the Big Push, designed to distract the Germans from their assault on Verdun. It would be known as the Battle of the Somme. On July 1st, the first day of the battle, the 2nd Suffolks set out from St Omer for the Somme.

They arrived at the front on July 8th, and were placed in reserve, and then on July 14th they were moved into the southern end of Caterpillar Wood, to the east of Albert. Not far off, on July 18th, the Germans attacked and, at great cost to them, overran Delville Wood and part of the town of Longueval. Two companies of the 2nd Suffolks were sent to support the counter-attack, and among them was Serjeant Arthur Page.

Shortly before first light on what would be a warm, sunny day, at 3.35am on July 20th, the Third Division of the British Army attacked Delville Wood. Chris McCarthy, in The Somme Day-by-Day, records that Early in the morning the Division made an attack on Delville Wood and village using 2nd Suffolks and 10th Royal Welsh Fusiliers. At 3.35 am the Suffolks advanced from the west, but the two leading companies were almost entirely wiped out. The Fusiliers went astray, and came under fire from a British machine-gun barrage, losing most of their officers, only to press home a fruitless attack.

The casualties in the 2nd Battalion were heavy, and among those killed in the attack was Arthur Page. He was 37 years old. It seems to have been a spectacularly foolhardy action: the two companies lost no less than ten officers in the attack, one of them, a Major Congreve, later being awarded a posthumous Victoria Cross.

Arthur's body was recovered, identified, and buried at Delville Wood cemetery in Longueval. He is remembered on the City of Ely war memorial, the Holy Trinity parish war memorial in Ely Cathedral, and on the memorial boards in St George's chapel, also in Ely Cathedral.

Herbert Page was my great-great-uncle, the younger brother of my great-grandfather Arthur Page and an uncle of my grandmother Phyllis Alice Page, my father's mother. Herbert signed up on 22nd July 1900 as a Boy in the Reserve of the 4th Battalion of the Suffolk Regiment, when he claimed to be a month short of his 15th birthday. In fact, he was 18. The reason may be that he was just four feet eight and half inches tall. His hair was brown, his eyes were grey, and he had a mole above his right buttock. He claimed to be a Wesleyan Methodist.

However, in 1903 he was punished for being drunk on duty, and there would be six further charges of being either drunk on duty or absent without leave over the next four ye











Ely Holy Trinity parish war memorial




Ely Holy Trinity parish war memorial





Ely Cathedral, Cambridgeshire

The Page brothers Arthur and Herbert on the Ely Holy Trinity war memorial in Ely Cathedral. The Lady Chapel of Ely Cathedral was the parish church of Holy Trinity parish until the Ely parishes were combined as Ely St Mary in 1938.

On the Roll of Honour website this memorial is listed as 'whereabouts unknown', for some reason. In fact, it is in Ely Cathedral.

Arthur Page was my great-grandfather, the father of my grandmother Phyllis Alice Page, my father's mother. Arthur was born on the 31st March 1879 at Annesdale, Ely, Cambridgeshire. He married my great-grandmother Sophia Cross on 12th January 1901 in the Lady Chapel of Ely Cathedral. They lived on Bull Lane in Ely (today renamed Lisle Lane) before moving to Broad Street, Back Hill and finally Waterside. Arthur was a railway labourer for the Great Eastern Railway, before getting a job with the Co-op.

When World War One broke out, Arthur immediately signed up. He was a Serjeant in the 2nd Battalion of the Suffolk Regiment, and his medal record shows that he arrived in France on the 26th January 1915.

The 2nd Battalion spent their first winter and spring bogged down in the trenches of the Vierstraat area of Flanders, before being returned to Billet at Westoutre on 11th April. They spent the latter part of the spring building the network of trenches in the Ypres salient, and then on June 16th they were part of the force which attacked and consolidated its hold in V Wood and Sanctuary Wood to the east of Ypres. It seems that the Battalion came under what were the first prolonged and sustained gas attacks by the Germans on British troops. During July they returned to billet in Ypres again, but spent the rest of the summer consolidating the hold on the splendidly named Spoil Bank and Bellyache Wood, again to the west of Ypres.

In general, the 2nd Suffolks seem to have spent an uneventful 1915 in Flanders, with few casualties, except for one major incident when, on September 8th, the battalion sustained more than a hundred deaths trying to capture a crater in Sanctuary Wood. Shortly after this, Arthur's brother Herbert was injured, and returned to England. He rejoined the Battalion at the start of 1916, when they were moved south towards St Eloi. Shortly after arriving in the area, Arthur's brother Herbert was killed.

In June 1916, the 2nd Suffolks were removed completely from the fighting and returned to depot at St Omer for training in open warfare. They did not know it, but the Generals were preparing for the Big Push, designed to distract the Germans from their assault on Verdun. It would be known as the Battle of the Somme. On July 1st, the first day of the battle, the 2nd Suffolks set out from St Omer for the Somme.

They arrived at the front on July 8th, and were placed in reserve, and then on July 14th they were moved into the southern end of Caterpillar Wood, to the east of Albert. Not far off, on July 18th, the Germans attacked and, at great cost to them, overran Delville Wood and part of the town of Longueval. Two companies of the 2nd Suffolks were sent to support the counter-attack, and among them was Serjeant Arthur Page.

Shortly before first light on what would be a warm, sunny day, at 3.35am on July 20th, the Third Division of the British Army attacked Delville Wood. Chris McCarthy, in The Somme Day-by-Day, records that Early in the morning the Division made an attack on Delville Wood and village using 2nd Suffolks and 10th Royal Welsh Fusiliers. At 3.35 am the Suffolks advanced from the west, but the two leading companies were almost entirely wiped out. The Fusiliers went astray, and came under fire from a British machine-gun barrage, losing most of their officers, only to press home a fruitless attack.

The casualties in the 2nd Battalion were heavy, and among those killed in the attack was Arthur Page. He was 37 years old. It seems to have been a spectacularly foolhardy action: the two companies lost no less than ten officers in the attack, one of them, a Major Congreve, later being awarded a posthumous Victoria Cross.

Arthur's body was recovered, identified, and buried at Delville Wood cemetery in Longueval. He is remembered on the City of Ely war memorial, the Holy Trinity parish war memorial in Ely Cathedral, and on the memorial boards in St George's chapel, also in Ely Cathedral.

Herbert Page was my great-great-uncle, the younger brother of my great-grandfather Arthur Page and an uncle of my grandmother Phyllis Alice Page, my father's mother. Herbert signed up on 22nd July 1900 as a Boy in the Reserve of the 4th Battalion of the Suffolk Regiment, when he claimed to be a month short of his 15th birthday. In fact, he was 18. The reason may be that he was just four feet eight and half inches tall. His hair was brown, his eyes were grey, and he had a mole above his right buttock. He claimed to be a Wesleyan Methodist.

However, in 1903 he was punished for being









24 inch pub table







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